16 Mar 2013

Japan by Dorothy

3/5

Star 0

Comment0

Went to the Honmura side of the island to check out Art House Project, a collection of old village homes that have been reformed into art spaces.

At the house project by James Turrell, we were instructed to walk single file into a pitch dark room and find our way to a long bench by feeling our hands along the wall. As our eyes slowly adjusted to the darkness, we could see a faint rectangle of light. When the rectangle became a little brighter, we were instructed to stand up and walk towards the light. Much like at one of his other works in the ChiChu Museum, my sense of space had been altered in a way that I didn’t realize 1) how close we were to the rectangle and 2) that it was not a flat projection, but actually a lit space that we could reach our hands into.

We visited all six art houses. While some projects were more interesting than others, I enjoyed viewing them within the context of traditional Japanese homes.

Star 0

Comment0

After checking into our hotel in Kanazawa, we had dinner at Daiba, a popular izakaya restaurant. We had duck stew (a Kanazawan specialty), sashimi, home-made tofu, cheese spring rolls with mentaiko fishcake, assorted yakitori, grilled nodoguro (blackthroat sea perch), sake and beer. The tofu had a really nice texture and the grilled sea perch was outstanding. Great, relatively inexpensive sake.

Star 1

Comment0

After dinner we went to Pole Pole, a dive bar in the Katamachi district that plays reggae music and lets you throw peanut shells on the floor.

We grabbed the last two seats at the small and dark bar — all of the patrons were locals, except for one ex-pat from the UK. The staff was super friendly. After we ordered our beer (we tried beers from Cuba and Kenya), they poured peanuts on the counter and gave us some cookies for ‘White Day,’ which in Japan is the opposite of Valentine’s Day (girls offer gifts to their boyfriends). The owner also gave us a Sharpie so that we could write something on the wall.

While chatting with the bar owners and the ex-pat beside us, we learned that Kanazawa is located where the cold waters meet the warm waters, so all types of seafood are available here. This explains why the seafood we had at dinner was so darn good.